ri-science
ri-science:

Why you should never put water on an oil fire.
On the roof of the Royal Institution, Dr Peter Wothers (presenter of the 2012 CHRISTMAS LECTURES) pours a small amount of water into a beaker of oil. The reaction is so violent because water and oil don’t mix. When the water is poured into the beaker of burning oil it sinks to the bottom and, due to the intense heat, vaporizes into steam almost instantaneously. With this phase change from a liquid to a gaseous state the water expands by up to 1700 times and forces the fire above it upwards. This oxygenates the oil and creates the huge flame.
Watch the full video, with more explanation, here.

ri-science:

Why you should never put water on an oil fire.

On the roof of the Royal Institution, Dr Peter Wothers (presenter of the 2012 CHRISTMAS LECTURES) pours a small amount of water into a beaker of oil. The reaction is so violent because water and oil don’t mix. When the water is poured into the beaker of burning oil it sinks to the bottom and, due to the intense heat, vaporizes into steam almost instantaneously. With this phase change from a liquid to a gaseous state the water expands by up to 1700 times and forces the fire above it upwards. This oxygenates the oil and creates the huge flame.

Watch the full video, with more explanation, here.

fyeahscienceteachers

fyeahscienceteachers:

thatscienceguy:

Lightning Appreciation Post:

  • There are nearly 500 lightning strikes every second around the world.
  • Only about 100 of these strike the earth, the others are between and within the clouds themselves.
  • Lightning is very visible from space (last gif from Astronaut Reid Wiseman)
  • Besides regular storms (thunder storms, hurricanes, etc.) lightning can be found in volcanoes (gif 3) and even intense forest fires.

In conclusion: nature is fucking awesome!

For teaching: environmental science, meteorology